The Bard's Tale Update 9: Mangar, Lagoth, Tarjan and…Monte Cook?

Announcements & media coverage pertaining to Bard's Tale IV. Only moderators & inXile can make new threads on this forum.

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Re: The Bard's Tale Update 9: Mangar, Lagoth, Tarjan and…Monte Cook?

Post by Zombra » June 21st, 2015, 11:06 am

On Bard's Tale 2004 graphics:

"While the game doesn't exactly push the envelope in any category, its graphics and art are quite good." - Worthplaying

"The game covers a great variety of environments, from light, breezy forests to dank Viking tombs, and the scenery changes up often enough so that there's always something new to look at." - Gamespot

"The environments in The Bard's Tale look fantastic and are easily on par with what other 3D isometric action-RPGs have done." - IGN

"The graphics and story line are very good." - Amazon user JJCEO

"Love the graphics and sound and songs and dialog." - Amazon user Miachelle

"The graphics will not wow you." - Amazon user Stephen
This is the worst criticism of BT 2004's art that I could find in 10 minutes of searching. Well, except for one:

"Lame" "Failure" - FinsterPrime

So ... they're probably using the same visual style because all the feedback on it was positive - at worst, critics didn't mention it.
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Re: The Bard's Tale Update 9: Mangar, Lagoth, Tarjan and…Monte Cook?

Post by Drool » June 21st, 2015, 12:22 pm

FinsterPrime wrote:Inexile is using the same look and even logo/font for Bard's Tale that they used on the steaming pile of shit they called bard's tale in 2003. If the Scottish vibe failed in 2003, why do it again???
Uh-huh.
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Re: The Bard's Tale Update 9: Mangar, Lagoth, Tarjan and…Monte Cook?

Post by jrodman » June 21st, 2015, 3:39 pm

Lucius wrote:InXile cannot use the font of the originals due to some weird contractual thing according to Heinemann.
EA has rights to original games in various ways.

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Re: The Bard's Tale Update 9: Mangar, Lagoth, Tarjan and…Monte Cook?

Post by jrodman » June 21st, 2015, 3:41 pm

Zombra wrote:...they're probably using the same visual style...
I'm confused. The in-engine video didn't look like the same visual style to me.

But I didn't play that game.

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Re: The Bard's Tale Update 9: Mangar, Lagoth, Tarjan and…Monte Cook?

Post by Zombra » June 21st, 2015, 4:12 pm

jrodman wrote:
Zombra wrote:...they're probably using the same visual style...
I'm confused. The in-engine video didn't look like the same visual style to me.
But I didn't play that game.
I didn't play [much of] the 2004 game either, but so far it looks way more like IV than the 1985 style does. I was surprised to see that they reused the 2004 logo for the 2015 banner. Compare those to the original logo. Which aesthetic they're going to pursue is pretty clearly indicated.

As for gameplay, what little we've seen of the new game looks a decent bit like 2004. The similarity isn't overwhelming, but again, they're much closer to each other than either is to 1985.
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Re: The Bard's Tale Update 9: Mangar, Lagoth, Tarjan and…Monte Cook?

Post by Herodite » June 21st, 2015, 4:30 pm

Zombra wrote:
jrodman wrote:
Zombra wrote:...they're probably using the same visual style...
I'm confused. The in-engine video didn't look like the same visual style to me.
But I didn't play that game.
As for gameplay, what little we've seen of the new game looks a decent bit like 2004. The similarity isn't overwhelming, but again, they're much closer to each other than either is to 1985.
A game made in 2015 resembles more a game made in 2004 than in 1985? :o

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Re: The Bard's Tale Update 9: Mangar, Lagoth, Tarjan and…Monte Cook?

Post by Zombra » June 21st, 2015, 4:54 pm

Yes, well the point is that I can see what FinsterPrime means by saying the new game looks like the 2004 title instead of evolving the aesthetics of the originals :oops:
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Re: The Bard's Tale Update 9: Mangar, Lagoth, Tarjan and…Monte Cook?

Post by IHaveHugeNick » June 21st, 2015, 5:01 pm

Its almost like there's only so many ways a dungeon can look. :D
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Re: The Bard's Tale Update 9: Mangar, Lagoth, Tarjan and…Monte Cook?

Post by jrodman » June 21st, 2015, 6:46 pm

Zombra wrote:Yes, well the point is that I can see what FinsterPrime means by saying the new game looks like the 2004 title instead of evolving the aesthetics of the originals :oops:
I'm pretty doubtful you could create something highly evocative of Bard's Tale 1 2 and 3's aesthetics in a 3d engine and have it feel right. The buildings looked super flat, and the highly static posed shots of the monsters would feel stilted.

I mean, by all means if someone made a game in that style I'd love to see it, and would probably buy it. But I'm not surprised that they're not.

(For what it's worth, I find Devil Whiskey feels a bit awkward, though it tries hard, but it shot for a much lower bar than this is.)

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Re: The Bard's Tale Update 9: Mangar, Lagoth, Tarjan and…Monte Cook?

Post by Priest4hire » June 22nd, 2015, 2:45 am

IHaveHugeNick wrote: A lot of historical figures lived long. If you're a king, you'll generally have a decent living standard even in the middle ages. Same goes for people in the monastaries, who rarely had to starve, you know. But the general population living expectancy was in the 30-40s.

And no, I'm not saying everyone thought New Testament is false. I'm saying it still got distorted and ridden with inconsistencies, even with tremendous effort to preserve it untouched. What chances do the campfire stories have?

The paesants would certainly be interested in a cool campfire stories, what he wouldn't be interested in, is preserving them for 150 years without distortion.

I don't see this as any less plausible, than, say, people in ancient Greece not believing the myths were real events.
Alright, at risk of repeating myself, the 30-40 year average life expectancy includes child mortality, which was high in the middle ages. That pulled the numbers down. Peasants were not dropping dead in the 30s but rather a lot were dying before the age of 5.

I'd hoped to avoid discussing the Bible, but alright. There were no eyewitnesses. The closest thing to that would be Paul. The gospels were not written by the people they are named after, though they're not pseudepigraphic either. Rather the "gospel according to" part is essentially a literary device. Gospel means 'good news' which is what they were: Not recordings of exact history but expressions of faith. It would be 40 years after the death of Jesus that the first gospel was written, and over 150 before the books would be collected into a semblance of the modern New Testament. The early development of the New Testament are extremely messy and complex, and don't really work for your example.

And what compels you to compare a Bard's work, being backed by a lifetime of study and training in mnemonics, to campfire stories? But you're right, they would be distorted. There would be embellishments and variances, especially between regions. There would be different accounts of the destruction of Skara Brae, and the heroes themselves would probably be inflated into legendary characters with all sorts of deeds attached to them. In fact, wouldn't that be kind of cool if you could put the names of your original party into the game at the beginning, and later on discover stories of their deeds similar to the Knight of the Round Table?

But forgotten or dismissed? This is nothing like Greek myths, this is like the Athenians forgetting that Persia sacked Athens. When Alexander invaded the Persians about 150 years later, the Athenians had very much not forgotten. At all. It would be the people of Malta deciding the Siege of Malta was a myth 150 years later. Tarjan slaughtered every man, woman and child in Skara Brae. Imagine the carnage and horror of the thing. During a celebration no less, and when bards where there from "the world over" to celebrate the deeds of the heroes. There would be numerous written accounts. And they are rebuilding this very city. People are claiming this never happened even as they walk on the spot where what must have been the most horrific massacre of their age took place. Nobody is that stupid.

And the real kicker is this backstory was created to cut off this game from the originals. It's not here because is make and damn sense, or serves the game well. It's here because they want to use the name and cherrypick the original, but they don't want to be bound to having to make a proper sequel out of it.
Zombra wrote:After that, everyone learned their lesson. They made sure to keep the wards up and all the protective spells in place, and remember every day the mistakes they'd made in the past, and above all to never ever let things get out of hand. Everybody got along and no more monsters appeared. And into this tranquil scene a new group of heroes arose! ... Or they would have if there had been any call for them whatsoever. Actually after that everybody just hung around the tavern at night and did their jobs during the day and lived happy, trouble-free lives from then on.

Sounds like a great game to me. :?
What strikes me is the implication that you so little faith in the writers at inXile that you believe it was either what we got or crap. Basically, your saying we would be thankful it's only as bad as it is and not something outright terrible. That it was the reset switch or nothing. But fine, let's try another approach and see if it can be done.

The lightweight fantasy approach: The rebuilding of Skara Brae is going well and the monument/tomb of the heroes stands proud. Then one day the monument is desecrated, the likenesses of the heroes destroyed and most shockingly, their bodies vanished. At the same time, some unfinished areas of the city begin to experience disappearances and monster sightings. And rumors begin to spread that the bodies of the heroes that supposedly vanished were never in the tomb to begin with. Meanwhile a local tavern owner discovers a sinkhole in the basement of this inn that leads into tunnels and hires a group of adventures to check it out, hoping they'll find treasure that he won't need to report. Only what those adventures find festering down there...

The more grim version: The heroes were famous right up until the moment they left for realms far away to battle unimaginable evils, and never returned. Right about then though a companion of theirs, and an intelligent and powerful archmage in his own right, gains prominence. He's traveled through time and dimensions and he has a message: We are all in terrible danger from forces beyond comprehension. The obliteration of Skara Brae is just the iceberg. He preaches the need for security, which can only be achieved through extreme diligence. All gods are really ancient and terrible creatures who use the gullibility of their followers to gain a foothold in this world. Magic is both a powerful weapon to keep everyone safe and a terrible fire that could wipe out all life.

A god from another realm crossed the barriers and snuffed out the lives of thousands. This act, still fresh, lends great credence to this man. As does his seemingly moderate and reasonable demeanor. All religion must be stamped out, but not because religious people are bad. It's just too dangerous to do otherwise. But it's not about persecution, see? Just security. Likewise, all magic must be strictly controlled. Not because rogue mages are bad people, but because a single loose spark could doom us all. And there is danger everywhere. Strangers could be monsters in disguise. People who disagree with the archmage could be agents looking to bring horrors into the world.

And this paranoia didn't die down. Not long after the rebuilding of Skara Brae got underway there was an attack by monsters from beyond the veil. They went on a rampage that only ended when the archmage himself confronted and destroyed them. This whipped the fear into a frenzy and led to the current paranoid and oppressive state. And the archmage is still alive, his life extended via his tremendous power. But at the same time, there are those who resist. An underground movement who meet in the tunnels beneath the city and hear stories of strange occurrences. Inspired by the heroes of old, they investigate such happenings and in doing so begin to discover that they very actions being taken to make everyone safe may be dooming them all....

Sorry about the size of this post. My point here is why pull this reset button crap when you could build on what came before. Why do the generic opressive fantasy religion thing again when you could instead explore the tension between security and liberty as well as the paranoia and state of fear resulting from the destruction of Skara Brae. The destruction and rebuilding of Skara Brae should have an impact on the story rather than being brushed aside in favour of a bunch of irrelevant new stuff involving Catholic church analogs and fantasy clichés.

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Re: The Bard's Tale Update 9: Mangar, Lagoth, Tarjan and…Monte Cook?

Post by Crosmando » June 22nd, 2015, 4:48 am

Who cares you Fallout fanboy, story and characters are not important, the point of a BT game is killing things and looting their crap.
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Re: The Bard's Tale Update 9: Mangar, Lagoth, Tarjan and…Monte Cook?

Post by ZiN » June 22nd, 2015, 7:40 am

Very well put Priest4hire, a bit wordy, but thanks anyway. Prepare to get your thoughts misinterpreted and dismissed though (just like mine, even though yours are better composed).
Even some of the old fans don't see through this measly attempt to reset the setting and keep the name.
The most aggravating thing about it is, that it's pointless: The name itself isn't getting them the expected results, as seen on the funding. (It was in the negative some time ago, which means high tier backers pulling/reducing their pledges. For me it's a solid $20 for the free stuff.)
Seemingly their writers are rather out of the picture, regarding Bard's Tale lore, storyline and character portrayal, hence the need for the time-skip/world reset.

This looks like a pretty big screw-up to me, i don't really know what happened, it started out so good and promising. Not all is lost though, they can still scrap this shit story and rethink the course of the whole project, since it's obviously not going as well as they initially planned. If they lack flexibility and insist on being hard-shell, the game will come to a huge mucker.
Crosmando wrote:Who cares you Fallout fanboy, story and characters are not important, the point of a BT game is killing things and looting their crap.
Yeah, to some extent, that's my opinion too, but this story preview is just so revolting and reflect so badly on the whole thing, that some of us can't resist drawing attention to, that something smells fishy.

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Re: The Bard's Tale Update 9: Mangar, Lagoth, Tarjan and…Monte Cook?

Post by thebruce » June 22nd, 2015, 9:00 am

On the reliability of oral tradition in early AD centuries, both jews and greeks placed great value on accuracy and the skills required for memorization. 150 years, at that time, I would agree with some here that it is not that significant, and details would surely be kept in tact for that relatively short amount of time.
And keeping it strictly about the passage of oral history and early writings, here's an article going into detail about reliability of the dates, authors, and general historicity of the Gospel books:
http://www.tektonics.org/ntdocdef/gospdefhub.php
And here is an article that goes into all of those points about maintenance of writings and historical events by oral tradition.
https://bible.org/article/historical-re ... ty-gospels
Jesus' ministry was from A.D. 27-30. Noted New Testament scholar, F.F. Bruce, gives strong evidence that the New Testament was completed by A.D. 100. Most writings of the New Testament works were completed twenty to forty years before this. The Gospels are dated traditionally as follows: Mark is believed to be the first gospel written around A.D. 60. Matthew and Luke follow and are written between A.D. 60-70; John is the final gospel, written between A.D. 90-100.
Were the Gospels written by eyewitnesses of the events, or were they not recorded until centuries later? As with the internal evidence, the external evidence also supports a first century date.
Fortunately, New Testament scholars have an enormous amount of ancient manuscript evidence. The documentary evidence for the New Testament far surpasses any other work of its time. We have over 5000 manuscripts, and many are dated within a few years of their authors' lives.
Here are some key documents... <snip>
Was the oral tradition memorized and passed on accurately? Skeptics assert that memory and oral tradition cannot accurately preserve accounts from person to person for many years.
The evidence shows that in oral cultures where memory has been trained for generations, oral memory can accurately preserve and pass on large amounts of information. Deuteronomy 6:4-9 reveals to us how important oral instruction and memory of divine teaching was stressed in Jewish culture. It is a well-known fact that the rabbis had the O.T. and much of the oral law committed to memory. The Jews placed a high value on memorizing whatever writing reflected inspired Scripture and the wisdom of God. I studied under a Greek professor who had the Gospels memorized word perfect. In a culture where this was practiced, memorization skills were far advanced compared to ours today. New Testament scholar Darrell Bock states that the Jewish culture was "a culture of memory."
Previously, we showed that the Gospels were written in the first century, within the lifetime of the eyewitnesses. These eyewitnesses, both friendly and hostile, scrutinized the accounts for accuracy.

So the original writings were accurate. However, we do not have the original manuscripts. What we have are copies of copies of copies. Are these accurate, or have they been tampered with? As shown earlier, we have 5000 Greek manuscripts of the New Testament. When you include the quotes from the church fathers, manuscripts from other early translations like the Latin Vulgate, the Ethiopic text, and others, the total comes out to over 24,000 ancient texts. With so many ancient texts, significant alterations should be easy to spot. However, those who accuse the New Testament of being corrupted have not produced such evidence. This is significant because it should be easy to do with so many manuscripts available. The truth is, the large number of manuscripts confirm the accurate preservation and transmission of the New Testament writings.

Although we can be confident in an accurate copy, we do have textual discrepancies. There are some passages with variant readings that we are not sure of. However, the differences are minor and do not affect any major theological doctrine. Most have to do with sentence structure, vocabulary, and grammar. These in no way affect any major doctrine.
So the point is, while passing down information by word or by writing may not be 100% perfect duplication, the details as from those eras are still consistent, feasible, and reliable. If the OT and NT can retain that level of accuracy over that length of time, it's almost certain that 150 years would be within a length of time short enough to retain details of events prior to that time, even merely by oral tradition.

However, Bard's Tale history isn't Biblical history :P So we then need to include possibility of "history is written by the winner", and the access lower classes, less educated/respected, had to such knowledge were it to be kept exclusively away from them (consider the Tyndale and the reformation, risking his own life to change that ruling classism over those documents).

Over 150 years, how much of that Bard's Tale history could have been "erased"? If the ruling powers put forth enough effort to expunge that history we knew so dearly from BT1-3 from the minds of the civilization in BT4, could this plot setup be feasible? *shrug* I suppose we'd need more details about the story to decide how feasible it would be :)
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Re: The Bard's Tale Update 9: Mangar, Lagoth, Tarjan and…Monte Cook?

Post by IHaveHugeNick » June 22nd, 2015, 9:59 am

Well no. OT and NT maintain consistency because they were being consistently pruned from anything that was deemed inconsistent, not because mouth to mouth traditions magically preserved everything to a T. A small-town Bard signing bunch of folk songs to drunk peasants in an inn, isn't going to be analyzed by a committee of scripture experts for accuracy. Like I've said, comparing campfire tales to a sacred text where countless thousands of people worked over millennia to preserve accuracy, is nonsensical.

And lol, "These in no way affect any major doctrine". So why is there 500 different branches and subbranches of Christianity, all with variations in doctrine? Oh.
Priest4hire wrote: Alright, at risk of repeating myself, the 30-40 year average life expectancy includes child mortality, which was high in the middle ages. That pulled the numbers down. Peasants were not dropping dead in the 30s but rather a lot were dying before the age of 5.
Of course they were droping dead in the 30s. And the 10s, 20s, and the 40s. Or a plague came and wipe out entire region, and there goes a whole bunch of folk traditions. You seem to be confusing life expectancy with everybody being dead after 40. Simply put, there's no point of applying modern standards of how long 150 year period is. With a litte luck, you can still find someone who knew someone who remembered slavery as an eyewitnesses. In Bard universum, that's not an option.

Priest4hire wrote: I'd hoped to avoid discussing the Bible, but alright. There were no eyewitnesses. The closest thing to that would be Paul. The gospels were not written by the people they are named after, though they're not pseudepigraphic either. Rather the "gospel according to" part is essentially a literary device. Gospel means 'good news' which is what they were: Not recordings of exact history but expressions of faith. It would be 40 years after the death of Jesus that the first gospel was written, and over 150 before the books would be collected into a semblance of the modern New Testament. The early development of the New Testament are extremely messy and complex, and don't really work for your example.
The development of NT works as an example because its a best example we have of a best case scenario. A sacred text, of a dominating religion, that's actually been studied to exhaustion by countless generations.
Priest4hire wrote: And what compels you to compare a Bard's work, being backed by a lifetime of study and training in mnemonics, to campfire stories? But you're right, they would be distorted. There would be embellishments and variances, especially between regions. There would be different accounts of the destruction of Skara Brae, and the heroes themselves would probably be inflated into legendary characters with all sorts of deeds attached to them. In fact, wouldn't that be kind of cool if you could put the names of your original party into the game at the beginning, and later on discover stories of their deeds similar to the Knight of the Round Table?
Mnemonics shmemonics. Its a dude signing songs from memory to bunch of drunk people at a fair, half of which are busy vomiting. If "barding" was the best way to preserve accuracy, lute class would be obligatory for historians.
Priest4hire wrote: But forgotten or dismissed? This is nothing like Greek myths, this is like the Athenians forgetting that Persia sacked Athens. When Alexander invaded the Persians about 150 years later, the Athenians had very much not forgotten. At all. It would be the people of Malta deciding the Siege of Malta was a myth 150 years later.
Its exactly like Greek myths. Myths describe supernatural events. The magic was banished, the mythical creatures are stuck in the other realms, its completely plausible that people wouldn't find stories about wizards throwing fireballs very believable.
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Re: The Bard's Tale Update 9: Mangar, Lagoth, Tarjan and…Monte Cook?

Post by ZiN » June 22nd, 2015, 10:00 am

Thanks for the reading material! It's quite a tough read (for non-native English speakers at least), but i'm working on it. Very interesting.
thebruce wrote:Over 150 years, how much of that Bard's Tale history could have been "erased"? If the ruling powers put forth enough effort to expunge that history we knew so dearly from BT1-3 from the minds of the civilization in BT4, could this plot setup be feasible? *shrug* I suppose we'd need more details about the story to decide how feasible it would be :)
As far a i know most of the Roman and Jewish leadership went to great lengths, to completely delete every trace of the New Testament too, at least until the 4th century AD. It was kept alive and maintained by the early Christian "church", which was actually a secret underground society in those early, menacing times.
So that abysmal background story they came up with, indeed has a parallel with Christianity. What's ironic about it, that the "Christians" are actually the good guys, who believe the bards' tales about the heroes ending Mangar, Lagoth and Tarjan, and gathering underground in exile.
Of course the author most likely has no idea about any of that, his incoherent ramblings are just meant for effect, with those trendy stereotypes thrown in for good measure.

As for the past BT events: There's simply no way to forget/erase those events, not even, if they hopped through Tarmitia and brought with them both the communist USSR's, China's, plus the Nazis' brainwash/steamroll machine to do so. Hmm, perhaps they went for Japan and brought their anime making crew? Then they might have a slight chance... but no... they don't!

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Re: The Bard's Tale Update 9: Mangar, Lagoth, Tarjan and…Monte Cook?

Post by thebruce » June 22nd, 2015, 10:21 am

IHaveHugeNick wrote:Well no. OT and NT maintain consistency because they were being consistently pruned from anything that was deemed inconsistent, not because mouth to mouth traditions magically preserved everything to a T.
You're talking about the compilation of the Bible as a whole. We're talking about individual writings, books. Please read those articles first if you haven't already.
A small-town Bard signing bunch of folk songs to drunk peasants in an inn, isn't going to be analyzed by a committee of scripture experts for accuracy. Like I've said, comparing campfire tales to a sacred text where countless thousands of people worked over millennia to preserve accuracy, is nonsensical.
Like I said, Biblical history is not Bard's Tale history :P
The point was - it's possible; so the question is, does the lore they're setting up for BT4 make it plausible in that context?
And lol, "These in no way affect any major doctrine". So why is there 500 different branches and subbranches of Christianity, all with variations in doctrine? Oh.
Different discussion, off topic.
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Re: The Bard's Tale Update 9: Mangar, Lagoth, Tarjan and…Monte Cook?

Post by jrodman » June 22nd, 2015, 11:35 am

Tarjan having slaughtered every man woman and child in Skara Brae doesn't really argue for the event being well recorded. Rather the opposite.

The historical examples of well-remembered sacks are based on the victims existing to remember them. We do not have accurate information about the destruction of Carthage, for example, except for what the Romans happened to write about it. This sort of scenario is where the Romans don't write anything.
Priest4hire wrote:What strikes me is the implication that you so little faith in the writers at inXile that you believe it was either what we got or crap. Basically, your saying we would be thankful it's only as bad as it is and not something outright terrible. That it was the reset switch or nothing.
I don't read that implication as being present at all. What I read is that the idea of forgetting serves a useful narrative function. Separately, I don't see a reset switch in content. Yes a big shift in approach, and in context, but I'm not sure that we can't imagine the old games in the context of what's before us.

That doesn't mean I'm sold on the specific narrative, but I disagree with these suggestions.

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Re: The Bard's Tale Update 9: Mangar, Lagoth, Tarjan and…Monte Cook?

Post by Lucius » June 22nd, 2015, 12:50 pm

"Skara Brae burned down because some tavern wench knocked over a candle in the dead of night, not because some fantasy god. Rumor has it she was a witch trying to do some incantation but she was too clumsy to do it right and ended up killing hundreds. If you ask me, I'm glad them Fatherites are burnin all them crazies these days. Last thing we need is some fool to burn it all down again"

The storyline is fine, and can work fine. I still question the timeline, but if an organization is actively trying to suppress facts from day 1, it can be plausible. They really need to emphasize that aspect in this game's lore.

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Re: The Bard's Tale Update 9: Mangar, Lagoth, Tarjan and…Monte Cook?

Post by Zombra » June 22nd, 2015, 1:01 pm

jrodman wrote:
Priest4hire wrote:What strikes me is the implication that you so little faith in the writers at inXile that you believe it was either what we got or crap.
I don't read that implication as being present at all. What I read is that the idea of forgetting serves a useful narrative function.
Thank you. You got it.
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Re: The Bard's Tale Update 9: Mangar, Lagoth, Tarjan and…Monte Cook?

Post by Drool » June 22nd, 2015, 1:29 pm

ZiN wrote:The name itself isn't getting them the expected results, as seen on the funding.
The game is fully funded. I would say that it's met expected results. As for people reducing pledges, you're just assuming it's your personal bugbear causing issues and not, say, the lack of defined combat, the 4 member party, or any number of other things people have been complaining about.
Priest4hire wrote:<<stuff>>
Well, sure, the story could be improved, but there's a vast gulf between "absolute shit" and "weak, but passable".
Lucius wrote:"Skara Brae burned down because some tavern wench knocked over a candle in the dead of night, not because some fantasy god. Rumor has it she was a witch trying to do some incantation but she was too clumsy to do it right and ended up killing hundreds. If you ask me, I'm glad them Fatherites are burnin all them crazies these days. Last thing we need is some fool to burn it all down again"
Heh. Nice.
Alwa nasci korliri das.

I neither work, nor speak, for inXile.

Not too late; make it eight!

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